Bionik’s suite of robotic rehabilitation products are the result of groundbreaking medical engineering research and development at the Newman Laboratory for Biomechanics and Human Rehabilitation at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Our systems have been tested by leading medical centers in dozens of controlled clinical trials, including large randomized controlled clinical studies. Through our research, we have discovered that the best way to optimize robot therapy is by allowing the robots to focus on reducing impairments and allowing the therapist to assist on translating the gains in impairment into function.

Bionik’s modular systems approach to neurorehabilitation is the only system designed to optimize the use of robotics in a manner that is consistent with the latest clinical research and neuroscience, taking into account the latest understanding on motor learning interference and motor memory consolidation.

Clinical Results

In a multi-center, randomized controlled trial involving 127 chronic stroke patients with moderate to severe upper-limb impairment, our assist-as-needed™ therapy demonstrated significant improvement in arm movement, function and quality of life. The study also found that “the improvements provide evidence of potential long-term benefits of rehabilitation and challenge the widely held clinical belief that gains in motor function are not possible for long term stroke survivors.”1

In a controlled clinical study involving 56 stroke inpatients, the motor skills of the robot-treated group improved significantly more than the control group. Analysis showed that interactive robotic therapy significantly reduced motor impairment of the treated limbs, doubling the impairment reduction.2

A multi-center VA study of 127 patients with long-term severe to moderate upper-limb impairment from a stroke that occurred at least 6 months before enrollment (average time of 4.7 years, 33% with multiple strokes) found that “the improvements provide evidence of potential long-term benefits of rehabilitation and challenge the widely held clinical belief that gains in motor function are not possible for long term stroke survivors.”

Technology

Our robotic products have exceptional capacity for measurement and immediate interactive response, which sets them apart from other therapy systems.

  • Senses the patient’s movement and responds to a patient’s continually-changing ability
  • Robots guide the exercise treatment accordingly
    • If the patient is unable to move, the robot gently assists the patient to initiate movement towards the target
    • If coordination is a problem, the robot “guides” the movement, allowing the patient to move towards the target and making certain that the patient is practicing the movement the correct way
    • As the patient gains movement control, the robot provides less assistance and continually challenges the patient
  • Provides quantifiable feedback on progress and performance

 

1. Lo. A.C., et.al “Robot-Assisted Therapy for Long-Term Upper Limb Impairment after Stroke,” New England Journal of Medicine, 362:1772, May 13, 2010
2. Volpe, B.T., Krebs, H.I., Hogan, N., Edelstein, O.L., Diels, C and Aisen, M., A Novel Approach to Stroke Rehabilitation Robot-Assisted Sensori-motor Stimulation, Neurology, 54 (2000) 1938-44